Proud As a Pea…cake?

Here's your nightly math! Just 5 quick minutes of number fun for kids and parents at home. Read a cool fun fact, followed by math riddles at different levels so everyone can jump in. Your kids will love you for it.

Proud As a Pea…cake?

September 9, 2019

We just love this flashy cake and cupcake combo! It was made by Malizzi Cakes for a big wedding party. Peacocks are famous for their feathers, so what better way to show them off than with a stream of cupcakes? The bakers told us the main cake can serve 75 people. That’s not counting the 125 cupcakes, each with 4 pieces of frosting to make the feather “eye.” All that baking and decorating took about 8 hours. But it was worth it, and we bet the cake was eaten in way less time!
 
Wee ones: If the cake uses white, blue, green, and yellow frosting, how many colors of frosting is that?
 
Little kids: If you eat the 6th tailfeather cupcake, then the 8th one, which number cupcake did you skip? Bonus: If you eat 5 cupcakes, and each is either chocolate or vanilla, can you eat an equal number of the 2 flavors?
 
Big kids: If there are 4 pieces of frosting on each cupcake, how many cupcakes would give you 64 pieces of frosting? Bonus: Out of the 125 cupcakes, there is 1 more vanilla than chocolate. How many chocolate cupcakes are there?
 
The sky’s the limit: The area of a circle equals pi times the circle’s radius squared (times itself). If the top 2 layers of the cake have radii of 3 and 4 inches, and the bottom layer has a radius of 5 inches, and all have equal heights, is there more cake in the top 2 layers or the bottom single layer?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:
Wee ones: 4 colors of frosting.
 
Little kids: The 7th cupcake. Bonus: No, because 5 is an odd number. You could have 4 of one flavor and 1 of the other, or 3 and 2.
 
Big kids: 16 cupcakes. Bonus: 62 chocolate. Think of it this way: if you took away the extra vanilla, you’d have 124 cupcakes with the same number of chocolate anyway, and they’d be exactly half of that total.
 
The sky’s the limit: There is an equal amount of cake in the top two layers as in the bottom single layer! The top two layers = 3 x 3 π  + 4 x 4 π = 9π + 16π = 25π. The single bottom layer = 5 x 5 π or 25π.

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About the Author

Laura Overdeck

Laura Overdeck

Laura Bilodeau Overdeck is founder and president of Bedtime Math Foundation. Her goal is to make math as playful for kids as it was for her when she was a child. Her mom had Laura baking before she could walk, and her dad had her using power tools at a very unsafe age, measuring lengths, widths and angles in the process. Armed with this early love of numbers, Laura went on to get a BA in astrophysics from Princeton University, and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business; she continues to star-gaze today. Laura’s other interests include her three lively children, chocolate, extreme vehicles, and Lego Mindstorms.

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