A Teeny Friend for Bambi

Here's your nightly math! Just 5 quick minutes of number fun for kids and parents at home. Read a cool fun fact, followed by math riddles at different levels so everyone can jump in. Your kids will love you for it.

A Teeny Friend for Bambi

June 10, 2017

If you’ve ever seen a grown-up deer, either at a zoo or prancing through your neighborhood, you know that they’re big animals — smaller than a horse, but bigger than you are. But some types of deer are very tiny, and the tiniest is the pudu. This baby pudu was born at Queens Zoo in New York City. It stood just 6 inches tall at birth, and will grow to only 1 foot tall! (at the shoulder) It also weighed less than a pound, and a lot less than you weighed when you were born. Like other baby deer, the pudu will lose its spots. It will also grow antlers just 2-3 inches long. A big deer could scoop up a whole pudu with its antlers!

Wee ones: How many legs does that pudu have? Who has more legs, a pudu or you?

Little kids: A pound has 16 ounces. Who weighs more, a 1-pound pudu or a 12-ounce bottle of water?  Bonus: If a 1-pound baby pudu grows to 13 pounds, how many pounds does it gain?

Big kids: The pudu will reach its full 12 inches at the shoulder in just 3 months. If your pet dog’s shoulder height is double that, how tall is your dog at the shoulder?  Bonus: If YOU doubled your height these next 3 months, how tall would you be?

 

 

 

Answers:
Wee ones: The pudu has 4 legs, so it has more legs than you.

Little kids: The pudu, but not by much!  Bonus: 12 more pounds.

Big kids: 24 inches.  Bonus: Different for everyone…take your height in inches and double it (or add that number to itself)!

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About the Author

Laura Overdeck

Laura Overdeck

Laura Bilodeau Overdeck is founder and president of Bedtime Math Foundation. Her goal is to make math as playful for kids as it was for her when she was a child. Her mom had Laura baking while still in diapers, and her dad had her using power tools at a very unsafe age, measuring lengths, widths and angles in the process. Armed with this early love of numbers, Laura went on to get a BA in astrophysics from Princeton University, and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business; she continues to star-gaze today. Laura’s other interests include her three lively children, chocolate, extreme vehicles, and Lego Mindstorms.

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