A Really Big Draw(ing)

Here's your nightly math! Just 5 quick minutes of number fun for kids and parents at home. Read a cool fun fact, followed by math riddles at different levels so everyone can jump in. Your kids will love you for it.

A Really Big Draw(ing)

February 26, 2016

Biggest drawing by one personCrayon on paper, chalk on sidewalk, finger in the dirt – they’re all great ways to draw a picture. And the bigger that paper or sidewalk, the bigger your picture. So while our friend and fan Nathaniel J. drew a picture of a mountain, he asked us, what’s the biggest picture in the whole world? Well, thanks to all those ways to draw, there’s more than one answer. For the biggest drawing by 1 person, Ashok Nagpure drew a pencil sketch 8 feet tall and a whopping 324 feet long – as long as a city block! Unbelievably, the world’s longest drawing is even longer: 2,055 feet of paper (about 1/2 mile), laid end to end by a guy who really is named Peter Draw. And if you want to go even bigger, Canadian cyclist Stephen draws huge pictures by riding his bike while holding a GPS tracker, which then traces his path as a red line on the map. This makes miles-wide pictures of unicorns, dinosaurs and other doodles — a lot easier than laying paper all across town.

Wee ones: If you want your drawing to have 5 colors, and you have pink, blue, green, and yellow chalk, do you have enough colors?

Little kids: If your drawing of a purple and white tiger covers 2 rows of sidewalk squares with 4 squares in each, how many squares have you covered?  Bonus: It took Ashok 7 months to draw his huge pencil drawing. If he started in March, when did he finish?

Big kids: If you take 11-inch-long sheets of paper and lay 9 of them end to end, how long a picture can you draw?  Bonus: Which way do you get to draw more neon green giraffes: 4 on each of those sheets, or 6 on every other sheet starting with the 1st?

 

 

 

Answers:
Wee ones: Not quite — you have 4 colors, which is less than 5.

Little kids: 8 squares.  Bonus: In October.

Big kids: 99 inches.  Bonus: More if you draw 4 of them 9 times, which gives 36 giraffes; the other way you draw 30 in total (6 per sheet on 5 sheets of paper).

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About the Author

Laura Overdeck

Laura Overdeck

Laura Bilodeau Overdeck is founder and president of Bedtime Math Foundation. Her goal is to make math as playful for kids as it was for her when she was a child. Her mom had Laura baking while still in diapers, and her dad had her using power tools at a very unsafe age, measuring lengths, widths and angles in the process. Armed with this early love of numbers, Laura went on to get a BA in astrophysics from Princeton University, and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business; she continues to star-gaze today. Laura’s other interests include her three lively children, chocolate, extreme vehicles, and Lego Mindstorms.

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