Popsicle Car

Here's your nightly math! Just 5 quick minutes of number fun for kids and parents at home. Read a cool fun fact, followed by math riddles at different levels so everyone can jump in. Your kids will love you for it.

Popsicle Car

January 13, 2018

A popsicle is just tasty flavored ice on a wooden stick. It’s really easy to make: you freeze juice in a container with a stick. Well, Mother Nature can turn just about anything into a popsicle, including people’s cars! In Buffalo, NY, an icy 47-mile-an-hour wind blowing across Lake Erie splashed waves over the edge, and covered this car here in sideways icicles. Behind it you can even see little frozen lake waves coming over the wall. Water can’t freeze while it’s moving fast, but if the air is cold enough and the water slows down, it can freeze into awesome shapes like icicles. But don’t ever lick any of this outdoor ice — your tongue will stick to it!

Wee ones: If you have 5 ice-covered cars and 1 that isn’t, how many cars do you have in total?

Little kids: That snow in Buffalo didn’t finish melting until July! If it had started snowing in October, during how many months did they have snow?  Bonus: How many more months would the snow have had to stay to fill 1 year?

Big kids: That year Buffalo got 129 inches of snow! Is that more or less than 10 feet? (Reminder if needed: A foot has 12 inches.)  Bonus: They normally get “only” 95 inches of snow. How much more is 129 inches?

 

 

 

Answers:
Wee ones: 6 cars.

Little kids: 10 months.  Bonus: 2 more months.

Big kids: It’s a little more than 10 feet, which is 120 inches (to compare, your ceiling is about 8 feet high).  Bonus: By 34 inches – almost 3 feet extra!

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About the Author

Laura Overdeck

Laura Overdeck

Laura Bilodeau Overdeck is founder and president of Bedtime Math Foundation. Her goal is to make math as playful for kids as it was for her when she was a child. Her mom had Laura baking while still in diapers, and her dad had her using power tools at a very unsafe age, measuring lengths, widths and angles in the process. Armed with this early love of numbers, Laura went on to get a BA in astrophysics from Princeton University, and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business; she continues to star-gaze today. Laura’s other interests include her three lively children, chocolate, extreme vehicles, and Lego Mindstorms.

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