Home Sweet Pizza

Here's your nightly math! Just 5 quick minutes of number fun for kids and parents at home. Read a cool fun fact, followed by math riddles at different levels so everyone can jump in. Your kids will love you for it.

Home Sweet Pizza

October 18, 2017

It takes a lot of money to buy a house: maybe hundreds of thousands of dollars, or even millions of dollars. Worse yet, when many people all want the same house, they all offer to pay more and more money, so the owner will sell to them and not to someone else. Well, one man who really, really wanted a house in Portland, Oregon had a smart idea. Donna DeNicola not only offered lots of money, but also said he’d send the owners a free pizza every month for the rest of their lives. DeNicola owns his own pizzeria, so he knew he could do this. And clearly the owners like pizza, because they said yes, and sold him their house. Let’s see how they feel 5 years from now!

Wee ones: If you make a “house” out of pizza by cutting a square, a triangle on top of it, and a little rectangle for the chimney, how many shapes did you cut?

Little kids: If DeNicola normally bakes 12 pizzas a day, but makes 1 extra for the Marshes today, how many pizzas does he make today?  Bonus: If the Marshes got their 1st pizza in July, what number pizza will they get this month (October)?

Big kids: If a pizza is worth $10, what’s the cost of the pizza DeNicola gives them in 1 year?  Bonus: If the pizza always shows up the 3rd Saturday of the month, what’s the latest in the month that day can be?

The sky’s the limit: If for a year Holly and Rob equally share those 8 slices each time, but the next year their 2-year-old starts eating 2 of the slices and again lets them split the rest, how many slices does Holly get to eat those 2 years?

 

 

 

Answers:
Wee ones: 3 shapes.

Little kids: 13 pizzas.  Bonus: Their 4th pizza.

Big kids: $120, since they get 12 pizzas.  Bonus: The 21st of the month.

The sky’s the limit: 84 slices, which sounds like plenty! She gets 4 per month for 12 months, then 3 per month for another 12 months, giving her 48+36=84 slices.

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About the Author

Laura Overdeck

Laura Overdeck

Laura Bilodeau Overdeck is founder and president of Bedtime Math Foundation. Her goal is to make math as playful for kids as it was for her when she was a child. Her mom had Laura baking while still in diapers, and her dad had her using power tools at a very unsafe age, measuring lengths, widths and angles in the process. Armed with this early love of numbers, Laura went on to get a BA in astrophysics from Princeton University, and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business; she continues to star-gaze today. Laura’s other interests include her three lively children, chocolate, extreme vehicles, and Lego Mindstorms.

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