National “Dress up Your Pet” Day

Here's your nightly math! Just 5 quick minutes of number fun for kids and parents at home. Read a cool fun fact, followed by math riddles at different levels so everyone can jump in. Your kids will love you for it.

National “Dress up Your Pet” Day

January 14, 2018

Today is National Dress up Your Pet Day, in case you weren’t already doing that and needed a good reason. We have no idea how this holiday began, but we bet the pets didn’t start it. True, you can find great clothes for your furry friend, like this costume that turns Hercules the pug into a pig. Companies make sweaters and booties for all different sizes of dogs. Comedian John Oliver has said Americans spend $310 million on costumes for pets in just 1 year! Other people just shove their regular clothes and jewelry onto their pets, and hope all those legs will find a place to go. This is where owning a pet octopus will make things tricky.

Wee ones: If you did have to dress up your pet octopus, what numbers would you say to count off its 8 legs?

Little kids: If you have 3 guinea pigs and sew a little sweater and hat for each of them, how many items do you make for them?   Bonus: The problem here is that guinea pigs love to chew. If they chew up the 3 hats and 1 sweater, how many items of clothing are left?

Big kids: If 27 dogs are romping around the dog park and 1/3 of them are dressed up for today, how many dogs are dressed up?  Bonus: If 9 more dogs show up and now 1/2 the total dogs are wearing outfits, how many of the new dogs came to the party dressed up?

 

 

 

Answers:
Wee ones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8.

Little kids: 6 items.  Bonus: 2 items, since they chewed up 4.

Big kids: 9 dogs.  Bonus: All of them, since you now have 36 dogs and 18 of them are dressed up. You only had 9 dressed-up dogs to start, so all 9 new ones had to be dressed up to boost it to 18.

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About the Author

Laura Overdeck

Laura Overdeck

Laura Bilodeau Overdeck is founder and president of Bedtime Math Foundation. Her goal is to make math as playful for kids as it was for her when she was a child. Her mom had Laura baking before she could walk, and her dad had her using power tools at a very unsafe age, measuring lengths, widths and angles in the process. Armed with this early love of numbers, Laura went on to get a BA in astrophysics from Princeton University, and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business; she continues to star-gaze today. Laura’s other interests include her three lively children, chocolate, extreme vehicles, and Lego Mindstorms.

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