How to Catch a Flying Grape

Here's your nightly math! Just 5 quick minutes of number fun for kids and parents at home. Read a cool fun fact, followed by math riddles at different levels so everyone can jump in. Your kids will love you for it.

How to Catch a Flying Grape

May 13, 2017

We’re not supposed to toss our food and catch it in our mouths, but some people just can’t stop themselves. And grapes are their favorite choice of food. Paul Tavilla says he’s caught a grape from the farthest distance, 327 1/2 feet away. Steve Spalding caught 116 grapes in 3 minutes, as shown in this video. But the only official Guinness world record holder is AJ Henderson, who in 2013 threw a grape 69 1/2 feet high and caught it in his own mouth. If you want to get great at catching grapes, take Paul’s advice: use black grapes because they’re easy to see, and keep your eyes open.

Wee ones: If your friend catches 4 grapes in a row and you catch 6 in a row, who caught more?

Little kids: If you catch the 1st grape you throw, then the 3rd, then the 5th, what grape do you catch next? Bonus: If you can catch 10 grapes per minute, how would you count them up over 4 minutes? Count up by 10s!

Big kids: If Steve had caught exactly 1,200 grapes in 1/2 hour, how many would he have caught in 1 hour? Bonus: How many did he catch per minute? (Reminder: A whole hour has 60 minutes.)

 

 

Answers:
Wee ones: You caught more!

Little kids: The 7th grape. Bonus: 10, 20, 30, 40.

Big kids: 2,400 grapes in an hour. Bonus: 40 grapes per minute, since a 1/2 hour has 30 minutes and 1200/30 = 40.

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About the Author

Laura Overdeck

Laura Overdeck

Laura Bilodeau Overdeck is founder and president of Bedtime Math Foundation. Her goal is to make math as playful for kids as it was for her when she was a child. Her mom had Laura baking while still in diapers, and her dad had her using power tools at a very unsafe age, measuring lengths, widths and angles in the process. Armed with this early love of numbers, Laura went on to get a BA in astrophysics from Princeton University, and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business; she continues to star-gaze today. Laura’s other interests include her three lively children, chocolate, extreme vehicles, and Lego Mindstorms.

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