A Little Bite of Lego

Here's your nightly math! Just 5 quick minutes of number fun for kids and parents at home. Read a cool fun fact, followed by math riddles at different levels so everyone can jump in. Your kids will love you for it.

A Little Bite of Lego

June 5, 2017

Gummy Lego minifigureLego bricks stack up great because they snap together so well, thanks to the funny bumps on top. But what if you made gummy candy that shape? It turns out you can, right in your own kitchen! Just grab a grown-up, boil Jello and corn syrup in water with some food coloring, then pour the syrupy mixture into Lego molds (trays that shape the liquid into a Lego brick). In this video, the inventor of this makes gummy Lego in 7 different colors, neatly squirting the gooey gumminess into the trays using a ketchup bottle. Watch the video to find out the recipe!

Wee ones: If you make gummy Lego in blue, red, green and yellow, how many colors have you made?

Little kids: If you start with 9 gummy Legos and eat 3 of them, how many are left for building?  Bonus: If you have 9 gummy Legos, all either blue or red, and there’s 1 more blue than red, how many of each do you have?

Big kids: If you take 8 minutes to boil the mixture, 10 minutes to cool it and 9 minutes to squirt it into molds, how long does the project take?  Bonus: We can’t tell you how many gummy Legos are in your stack, but if you take away 4 from that number, double it and add 13, you get 37. How many gummy bricks are there?

 

 

 

Answers:
Wee ones: 4 colors.

Little kids: 6 bricks.  Bonus: 5 blue and 4 red. If you had 1 less blue, you’d have 8 total and half would be blue.

Big kids: 27 minutes.  Bonus: 16 bricks. The doubled number has to be 24 (13 less than 37), so the number you had before subtracting 4 is 12.

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About the Author

Laura Overdeck

Laura Overdeck

Laura Bilodeau Overdeck is founder and president of Bedtime Math Foundation. Her goal is to make math as playful for kids as it was for her when she was a child. Her mom had Laura baking while still in diapers, and her dad had her using power tools at a very unsafe age, measuring lengths, widths and angles in the process. Armed with this early love of numbers, Laura went on to get a BA in astrophysics from Princeton University, and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business; she continues to star-gaze today. Laura’s other interests include her three lively children, chocolate, extreme vehicles, and Lego Mindstorms.

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