The House That Could Fly

Here's your nightly math! Just 5 quick minutes of number fun for kids and parents at home. Read a cool fun fact, followed by math riddles at different levels so everyone can jump in. Your kids will love you for it.

The House That Could Fly

April 25, 2017

Have you ever flown in an airplane? Now how about living inside one? This hotel in Costa Rica turned the inside of an old plane into two nice wood-lined bedrooms, then stuck the whole plane on top of a 50-foot pole. That way visitors feel like they’re flying. Some other people turned a 727 into a 3-bedroom home; it sticks out over a lake as if it’s taking off. But don’t worry if you get airsick: as this webpage shows, people have turned ships, trains and even buses into very cool homes for themselves. When it comes to your dream house, it’s whatever floats your boat.

Wee ones: What shape are the plane windows in the lower picture?

Little kids: If your house could fly, and you flew it this morning, then tonight, then fly it twice tomorrow, how many times do you fly it? Bonus: If the plane’s belly is 50 feet off the ground, how many 10-foot ladders do you need to stack to climb up there? Try counting up by 10s!

Big kids: If they started decorating the plane June 10th and it took 5 months, in what month did they finish? Bonus: If that airplane has 21 windows on both long sides, plus 2 in front for the pilot, how many windows does the plane have?

The sky’s the limit: If your plane house starts flying at 100 miles an hour at the bus house, and the bus starts driving towards the plane at 20 miles an hour at the same time, how far from the original bus spot do they meet if they start 18 miles apart? (Hint if needed: You don’t have to figure out how long it takes to meet to solve this!)

Answers:
Wee ones: Squares (with rounded corners).

Little kids: 4 times. Bonus: 5 ladders.

Big kids: In November. Bonus: 44 windows (42 side ones plus the 2 extra).

The sky’s the limit: 3 miles from the bus starting point. Whatever distance the bus drives, the plane travels 5 of those chunks since it’s 5 times as fast. So that 18 miles can be cut into 6 equal pieces, and the bus will drive 1 of them while the plane flies 5 of them. That means the bus drives 1/6th of 18, or 3 miles.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

About the Author

Laura Overdeck

Laura Overdeck

Laura Bilodeau Overdeck is founder and president of Bedtime Math Foundation. Her goal is to make math as playful for kids as it was for her when she was a child. Her mom had Laura baking before she could walk, and her dad had her using power tools at a very unsafe age, measuring lengths, widths and angles in the process. Armed with this early love of numbers, Laura went on to get a BA in astrophysics from Princeton University, and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business; she continues to star-gaze today. Laura’s other interests include her three lively children, chocolate, extreme vehicles, and Lego Mindstorms.

More posts from this author