Dog for a Day

Here's your nightly math! Just 5 quick minutes of number fun for kids and parents at home. Read a cool fun fact, followed by math riddles at different levels so everyone can jump in. Your kids will love you for it.

Dog for a Day

August 30, 2018

If you have a dog and you go away this weekend, you might need someone to take care of your pooch while you’re away. But then there are people who work all week and wish they had a dog only on the weekend. Hey, wait — they could just share your dog with you! And people really do this. There are dog-share companies out there who help people come together to take turns keeping a dog. Sometimes whole groups of people swap the same dog around and around. It’s a great idea: the dog always gets food and playtime and attention, and everyone gets to play with a pet. It works out perfectly — well, depending on the dog…

Wee ones: If you take care of a dog, then your friend gets the dog, then you get the dog, then your friend gets the dog…who gets the dog next?

Little kids: If you get the dog on a Friday and give the dog back 2 days later, on what day does that happen?  Bonus: If you get the dog on Thursday from someone who got it 2 days before that, when did that person get the dog?

Big kids: If you and 5 friends all share Rufus, and each of you gets him for 5 days, how many days does Rufus get shared?  Bonus: If you don’t feed Rufus enough and he chews through your $250 carpet and $80 of your clothes, how much did Rufus cost you?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:
Wee ones: You get the dog next!

Little kids: On Sunday.  Bonus: On Tuesday.

Big kids: 30 days, since 6 people are sharing him.  Bonus: $330.

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About the Author

Laura Overdeck

Laura Overdeck

Laura Bilodeau Overdeck is founder and president of Bedtime Math Foundation. Her goal is to make math as playful for kids as it was for her when she was a child. Her mom had Laura baking before she could walk, and her dad had her using power tools at a very unsafe age, measuring lengths, widths and angles in the process. Armed with this early love of numbers, Laura went on to get a BA in astrophysics from Princeton University, and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business; she continues to star-gaze today. Laura’s other interests include her three lively children, chocolate, extreme vehicles, and Lego Mindstorms.

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