How to Dance in 100 Places

Here's your nightly math! Just 5 quick minutes of number fun for kids and parents at home. Read a cool fun fact, followed by math riddles at different levels so everyone can jump in. Your kids will love you for it.

How to Dance in 100 Places

June 9, 2017

Do you like to dance? Do you know any cool moves? People who like to dance like to learn hundreds of new steps, as many as they can. This guy took it one step further: Matt Bray danced in 100 places. He danced each move in 3, 4 or even 5 places, then connected the pieces of video perfectly with the music. He looks like he just keeps dancing while the scenery changes. Then he switches to the next step in the routine, a hip hop step or a moonwalk, and does that in a few more places. See if you can guess where he is in each part of the video — and see if you can dance like him!

Wee ones: If you do 8 big hops to the music, what numbers do you say to count them? Try it!

Little kids: If Matt moonwalks 3 steps in the first spot, 2 in the next, and 4 in the one after that, how many steps has he moonwalked?  Bonus: If he did all but 2 of those with his right foot, how many did he do with his right foot?

Big kids: If it took Matt 2 hours to film in each spot except for 5 hours at the very last place, how long did it take him to film in 100 places?  Bonus: If you want to dance each move in exactly 4 places, how many cool moves do you need to know to cover 100 places?

 

 

 

Answers:
Wee ones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8.

Little kids: 9 steps.  Bonus: 7 steps.

Big kids: 203 hours: It would have been 200, but switching the last 2 hours to 5 adds 3.  Bonus: 25 moves.

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About the Author

Laura Overdeck

Laura Overdeck

Laura Bilodeau Overdeck is founder and president of Bedtime Math Foundation. Her goal is to make math as playful for kids as it was for her when she was a child. Her mom had Laura baking while still in diapers, and her dad had her using power tools at a very unsafe age, measuring lengths, widths and angles in the process. Armed with this early love of numbers, Laura went on to get a BA in astrophysics from Princeton University, and an MBA from the Wharton School of Business; she continues to star-gaze today. Laura’s other interests include her three lively children, chocolate, extreme vehicles, and Lego Mindstorms.

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